Blog posts & articles

Why culture is key to good health and wellbeing

Health care is a vital concern for all governments. Thanks to a growing body of clinical and neurological research, there is evidence that participation in cultural activity offers significant benefits for a range of medical conditions. 

Health care professionals have realised that health care is not only their domain, but that they need partners. Arts and culture is an obvious one. And art is not just relevant for individual wellbeing and specific health conditions. Engaging in creativity contributes to a healthy cultural identity, to community and to society. Art and culture is often where people come together, listen, understand and build awareness of others – making it fundamental to democracy.

How can policy and politics ensure that people have access to and can engage with cultural activities to contribute to their wellbeing? This was a panel discussion at the Festival of Politics in Scotland last year with Clare Adamson (Member of the Scottish Parliament), David Leventhal (Dance for Parkinsons), Sarah Munro (Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art) and Prof. Raymond MacDonald (University of Edinburgh).

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Blog posts & articles

Why culture is key to good health and wellbeing

Health care is a vital concern for all governments. Thanks to a growing body of clinical and neurological research, there is evidence that participation in cultural activity offers significant benefits for a range of medical conditions. 

Health care professionals have realised that health care is not only their domain, but that they need partners. Arts and culture is an obvious one. And art is not just relevant for individual wellbeing and specific health conditions. Engaging in creativity contributes to a healthy cultural identity, to community and to society. Art and culture is often where people come together, listen, understand and build awareness of others – making it fundamental to democracy.

How can policy and politics ensure that people have access to and can engage with cultural activities to contribute to their wellbeing? This was a panel discussion at the Festival of Politics in Scotland last year with Clare Adamson (Member of the Scottish Parliament), David Leventhal (Dance for Parkinsons), Sarah Munro (Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art) and Prof. Raymond MacDonald (University of Edinburgh).

Find out more here

Interested in more stories like this? Sign up to our monthly newsletter.

Image credit: Danilo Rios on Unsplash