Case study

Housing: A hidden value of culture organisations

This is part of our series of case studies or examples how a culture organisation contributes to one of the 12 dimensions of wellbeing from QWB Lab's Wellbeing Framework.

Housing might sound like an unlikely role of culture organisations and we often get asked about that. In our Wellbeing Framework we describe it as “A space that is healthy, suitable, affordable and inspiring, where to exchange ideas, have a good time, and build relationships”.

Culture organisations can be considered urban 'third spaces'. In an article for the Guggenheim they are considered "neutral, accessible, and often public spaces that serve as places for building community and social connections. They are spaces outside of our home, school, or work where we can freely engage with others for the purpose of finding a sense of belonging, acceptance, happiness, and even delight." And not to forget that these spaces are usually carefully designed by significant architects and convey a special atmosphere not just through the objects and art on display but also in their social spaces.

The author's observations at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City show how its famous rotunda can facilitate a different experience not only for viewing art but for creating a conscious, shared experience for people of different social backgrounds, ethnicities, and ages.

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Case study

Housing: A hidden value of culture organisations

This is part of our series of case studies or examples how a culture organisation contributes to one of the 12 dimensions of wellbeing from QWB Lab's Wellbeing Framework.

Housing might sound like an unlikely role of culture organisations and we often get asked about that. In our Wellbeing Framework we describe it as “A space that is healthy, suitable, affordable and inspiring, where to exchange ideas, have a good time, and build relationships”.

Culture organisations can be considered urban 'third spaces'. In an article for the Guggenheim they are considered "neutral, accessible, and often public spaces that serve as places for building community and social connections. They are spaces outside of our home, school, or work where we can freely engage with others for the purpose of finding a sense of belonging, acceptance, happiness, and even delight." And not to forget that these spaces are usually carefully designed by significant architects and convey a special atmosphere not just through the objects and art on display but also in their social spaces.

The author's observations at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City show how its famous rotunda can facilitate a different experience not only for viewing art but for creating a conscious, shared experience for people of different social backgrounds, ethnicities, and ages.

Interested in more stories like this? Sign up to our monthly newsletter.

Image: Taylor Here on Unsplash